The Value of a Writing Notebook

Last Monday morning before work I read this post about the connection between a writer and his or her notebook. Later that morning I thought about my notebook. I carry it with me almost every time I leave my house. I bring it to church, and I keep it in my pocket at work. Sometimes during breaks or while waiting for our shift meetings to begin, I will sit on a shipping pallet and write a few notes. I wonder if my co-workers watch me and wonder what I am doing each day.

One time many months ago I lost one of my notebooks. I was not panicking, but I was seriously worried. Sure, I could re-write some of my ideas, but not all of them. Even those I re-wrote would not be quite the same. Losing that notebook would be a serious loss. Eventually I did find it. It had fallen into the narrow slot between the car seat and the storage compartment between the seats. What a relief!

When I am recording my first thoughts on a new idea I prefer to write them by hand. Sometimes I do not know how I will use an idea. Sometimes it is vague, and I do not know how I will complete it. Not a problem. I write my notes anyway. Maybe I will think of a way to use them someday. The notes do not need to be perfect. A perfectionist approach will get me nowhere. At this stage they only to be written.

For my writing activities, my most valuable possessions are my tablet and my notebooks. Losing a notebook would be worse than losing a favorite book. I can replace a book, but I cannot replace a notebook. Yes, many of my notes are typed into my computer, but some are not typed. Even if every word was typed into my computer, I would still hate to lose the notebook. It contains my ideas in their earliest forms.

About henrywm

I am a graduate from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary with a Ph.D. in Systematic Theology. I am interested in Christian theology and church history. I also enjoy science fiction and stories which wrestle with deep questions.
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